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31 Tricks to Navigating Treats and Having a Healthy Halloween

One month out of the year is simply spookier than the rest; a time to enjoy harmless frights, chilling stories, and terrifying costumes.

But that’s all make-believe. Lung disease, however, is a real-life scare that affects millions.

For that reason, Healthy Lung Month is also observed every October, raising awareness for better breathing habits and lung health.

According to the American Lung Association, more than 12.5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and around 150,000 people die from it each year, making it one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. Millions more are believed to be undiagnosed.

Lung cancer is another major issue, with around 230,000 new cases each year. More than 150,000 people die from lung cancer annually, making it the number one cause of cancer death in the United States.

There are many other lung diseases and conditions that can affect people’s health, including asthma, tuberculosis, and pneumonia. These diseases can cause a great deal of distress for those who suffer from them, as well as their families.

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, you should talk to your doctor about lung health:

  • Difficulty breathing, even when you are not active
  • Shortness of breath
  • Excessive coughing, especially when you have a cold or flu
  • Chest congestion
  • Wheezing
  • A persistent dry cough
  • Bluish color to the lips or fingernails due to lack of oxygen

There are many things you can do to keep your breathing better as you age. Here are just 5 steps to healthier lungs:

  1. Quit smoking: Smoking is the number one cause of preventable death in the United States, and it is also a major risk factor for lung cancer. If you smoke, quitting is the most important thing you can do for your health. There are many resources available to help you quit, and there are also medications that can help make quitting easier. If you don’t smoke, don’t start.
  2. Exercise regularly: Exercise has many benefits for your overall health, including healthier lungs. When you exercise, your body takes in more oxygen, which helps to improve your overall lung function. It also strengthens your lungs and helps them to work more efficiently. Choose activities that you enjoy so you’ll be more likely to stick with them.
  3. Eat a healthy diet: Eating fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can help your lungs function at their best. It’s also important to avoid foods that are high in saturated fat and sugar.
  4. Stay hydrated: Staying hydrated is important for your overall health, and it’s particularly important for your lungs. Drinking plenty of water helps to prevent your lungs from becoming dry and irritated.
  5. Avoid exposure to toxins: Exposure to toxins can damage your lungs and increase your risk of developing lung cancer or other respiratory illnesses. Try to avoid exposure to pollutants and other harmful chemicals whenever possible. Masking can help. By keeping your lungs free from toxins, you will breathe easier and feel more energetic.

It’s simple: healthier lungs = less coughing, less phlegm, and easier breathing. Quitting smoking, eating a healthier diet, and exercising regularly are important steps that you can take to feel better sooner.

Questions about improving your lung health? First Call Medical Center can help. Schedule an appointment online and talk to a doctor today

Most of your body’s cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein), also called “bad cholesterol. When there is too much of it, plaque buildup can form on your blood vessels, causing them to narrow. Without proper flow of blood to and from your heart, your risk for heart disease, angina, and stroke increases, as well.

However, your HDL (high-density lipoprotein) – or “good cholesterol” – is responsible for absorbing cholesterol and transporting it to the liver, where it is flushed out of the body. This cholesterol is actually beneficial, helping to ward off heart disease and

One month out of the year is simply spookier than the rest; a time to enjoy harmless frights, chilling stories, and terrifying costumes.

But that’s all make-believe. Lung disease, however, is a real-life scare that affects millions.

For that reason, Healthy Lung Month is also observed every October, raising awareness for better breathing habits and lung health.

According to the American Lung Association, more than 12.5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and around 150,000 people die from it each year, making it one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. Millions more are believed to be undiagnosed.

Lung cancer is another major issue, with around 230,000 new cases each year. More than 150,000 people die from lung cancer annually, making it the number one cause of cancer death in the United States.

There are many other lung diseases and conditions that can affect people’s health, including asthma, tuberculosis, and pneumonia. These diseases can cause a great deal of distress for those who suffer from them, as well as their families.

related illnesses. Lifestyle choices – like changes to diet and weight loss – can help to improve your HDL levels.

Here are four heart-healthy tips to improve your cholesterol numbers.

  1. Eat better. It can be tough but avoiding man-made trans fats commonly found in fried and processed foods like chips and snack cakes is a critical starting point. Consumption of saturated fats found in most meats and dairy products should also be kept to a minimum. Unsaturated fats, on the other hand, have been shown to boost your good HDL cholesterol when consumed in moderation. These are found in fish, like salmon and trout, as well as nuts like almonds, hazelnuts, and pecans. Pumpkin seeds are also high in unsaturated fats.
  2. Exercise more: Even just an hour of moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce the most common kind of fat in your body, triglycerides. Not only that, but it increases your HDL numbers WHILE helping you achieve a healthier weight.
  3. Don’t smoke – at all. If you’re a smoker, quit. Increased LDL levels, and therefore increased risk of heart disease, is just one more reason that smoking is bad, bad, bad, bad for you. Talk to your doctor if you are having a hard time kicking the habit.
  4. Leverage technology: Multiple smartphone apps and fitness wearables are now available to help you track your levels and alert you to the need to make applicable lifestyle changes.

Of course, the first step in determining how cholesterol is impacting your life should be scheduling an appointment with your family doctor. First Call is open daily for routine medical and urgent care needs.